Wednesday, 13 March 2013

60 SECOND INTERVIEW: Emma Parkinson


MASSAGE therapist Emma Parkinson grew up in North London before leaving to travel and complete an art degree. She moved to Dorset in 2007 but maintained links with London while she developed her interest in emotional healing and metaphysics. The 29-year-old now lives permanently in a cottage in Symondsbury – also one of three Bridport venues where she offers massage therapy sessions.

WHAT types of massages and therapies do you offer?
Aromatherapy massage allows me to select individual choices of essential oils and create a blend based on my client’s needs. Swedish massage involves long strokes, and deeper work around the thighs and upper back to relieve stress and tension. Reiki is a transmission of universal energy that I am able to draw upon, using intention and focus. The client will often feel heat or tingling throughout the body when receiving this treatment, and feel balanced and focused afterwards. 

WHAT can people expect from a session with you?
I have a very calm, peaceful aura, and people always comment upon my ability to listen and understand their needs. My massage practice is slow and very sensitive, and having practiced Tibetan Buddhism for the past nine years, I feel I can transmit a sense of grace and tenderness to my therapies. I am open minded and very spiritual. I have also practiced yoga privately for the past eight years, and would really love to provide private lessons for people in yoga or meditation if there is any interest. 

WHAT is Bowen Therapy?
The Bowen Therapy is a modality that I am studying and working with case studies at present. It is a process that resets the integral system of the body, the connections between nerves, connective tissue and muscles, and integrates them to their original state. It is brilliant for anyone with physical injures, trauma, long-standing problems, and even babies with colic or sleeping problems. 

HOW did you get into this field?
As I arrived back from America in 2011, having done personal emotional therapy work, I realised that I had changed so much within a year. I had released stuff I carried from my childhood and even past lives, habits that I had formed without realising why. This therapy is called The Journey, by Brandon Bays. I decided that I wanted to help people in the same way, especially those who are vulnerable and don’t know a way out of their emotional situation. I started with a Reiki course with Dorset Adult Learning and went on to study massage, aromatherapy and the Bowen. I still have a lot of dreams. These therapies are a starting point for me.

IS it important to get away from the stresses of every day life?
Yes. We push ourselves to the limit in terms of physical action, always doing, and every cell in our bodies react to this holding of tension. They cramp up and limit the communication within the body that allows us to eat, breathe and to process emotion healthily and fully. Any time when you can sit in silence and be comfortable, aware and grateful is time well spent. 

IS London life more stressful than Dorset life?
I would say so. It depends what stimulates you, but for me at present, London is a whirlwind of people and money-driven ideas. It is an amazing place, acceptance prevails, but the lifestyle is fast-paced. 

YOU recently initiated a scheme that saw Askers Meadow planted with trees. Why?
I was inspired by the parks of North London. We have three parks – Highgate, Cherry Tree and Coldfall woods. When I was younger I used to go wandering through them, and would always be inspired by something - the colours of the changing leaves, and the people I met. It is like a communal resting place. I found that the Woodland Trust were offering packs of trees, and felt that Bridport, although surrounded by beauty, had not much woodland or park space to really get lost in, to truly play, mess around with falling autumn leaves, and I wanted local children to have a slice of what I grew up with.

HOW important is it to you to keep in touch with nature?
It’s really important for me. I try to go for a walk every couple of days, even short walks, just to be grateful and to respond to something naturally created by the universe. 

WHAT is your earliest memory?
Probably watching my younger brother wrapping himself up in Christmas wrapping paper, then doing a headstand on the sofa and making a silly face. He always taught me to not take myself too seriously. To laugh at yourself is the height of joy I think. 

WHAT objects do you always carry with you? 
I have a necklace with a spiral silver container. Every few days I place a new crystal inside, choosing them intuitively, based on how I am feeling. Usually for spiritual protection, mental clarity and emotional balancing.

WHAT is the last book you read?
The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, by Sogyal Rinpoche. A book I always open up at random and read sections of for spiritual guidance and meditation practice. 

Emma practices throughout the week in Bridport and can also do home visits. She offers her therapies at a current rate of £30 for 75 mins, until April 30th. Thereafter it is £35. Any enquiries about meditation or yoga, or group bookings can be done at a discounted price.  Contact emma.parkinson@hotmail.com or 07581139416. Please check out her website at www.emmmango.blogspot.com


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